Entrepreneurial Game Strong(er): 12 Career Books for Women in 2016

career books for women, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

I certainly don’t consider myself a feminist, but after working in the male-dominated industry of finance for 5+ years straight out of college, I can confidently say that the gender gap in the workplace is something all hard-working female entrepreneurs should object to. Women make up almost half of today’s labor force, but in corporate America, we don’t share half of the power. Less than ten of the Fortune 500 company CEOs are women, and it’s only been in the last few years that even half of the Fortune 500 companies have more than one female officer. How is this possible, you may ask? Most women were never taught how to play, or feel comfortable playing, the game of business.

As a continuation of 12 Books All Girlbosses Should Read in 2015, I’ve created a new list of 12 career books for women in 2016 (and since it’s a new year, you can also check out 17 Books All Girlbosses Should Read in 2017, too!). These career books for women offer invaluable tips and tricks straight from the business coaching pros. They’ll make you laugh hysterically, and most importantly, they’ll give you the inspiration you need to finally make big, positive changes in your career in the coming year.

one | “You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life” by Jen Sincero

If you loved #Girlboss, you will be just as smitten with You Are a Badass. Jen Sincero, best-selling author, international success coach, and certified badass, teaches you to identify and change the self-sabotaging behaviors that stop you from getting what you want to create a life you love– and deserve. It’s as entertaining as it is inspirational, and her no-nonsense advice is far more useful than anything found in your stereotypical self-help book. Oh, and although this is featured on a list of the best career books for women, men can be just as inspired by Jen Sincero! One of the things I like most about You Are a Badass is that its message transcends gender, since we all suffer from self doubt and insecurity every now and again. 

career books for women, You Are a Badass, Jen Sincero, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

two | “The Confidence Code: The Science and Art of Self-Assurance— What Women Should Know” by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman

Just like the message of You Are a Badass compliments #Girlboss, The Confidence Code is an essential read for anyone who considers Lean In an entrepreneurial Bible. Kay and Shipman combine research in genetics, gender, behavior, and cognition to show that the key difference between men and women in the workplace is simply confidence– or lack thereof. I chose this as one of my favorite career books for women because it gives us the inspiration and practical advice to bridge the gender gap and achieve all of the career goals without hesitation.

career books for women, The Confidence Code, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

three | “Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman: What Men Know about Success that Women Need to Learn” by Gail Evans

In Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman, Gail Evans delivers a must-read for every woman who wants to learn to leverage her intrinsic power in the workplace. Using humor and her treasure trove of anecdotes from corporate life, she reveals the secrets to the playbook of success and teaches women at all levels of the organization, from assistant to vice president, how to play the game of business to their advantage.

career books for women, Play Like a Man, Play Like a Man Win Like a Woman, Gail Evans, An honest and practical handbook that reveals important insights into relationships between men and women and work, Play Like a Man, Win Like a Woman, is a must-read for every woman who wants to leverage her power in the workplace.

four | “Leave Your Mark: Land Your Dream Job. Kill It in Your Career. Rock Social Media.” by Aliza Licht

I’ll admit I didn’t know who Aliza Licht was until after reading this book, so in case you’re equally clueless, she’s essentially the poster child of PR for the fashion industry– so yeah, she’s dealt with the Meryl Streep’s a la The Devil Wears Prada of the workplace. Drawing invaluable lessons from her impressive resume, Leave Your Mark shares advice, inspiration, and a healthy dose of real talk for people just starting their careers, as well as for people who already kind of know what they’re doing.

career books for women, Leave Your Mark, Aliza Licht, Drawing invaluable lessons from her experience, Licht shares advice, inspiration, and a healthy dose of real talk in LEAVE YOUR MARK. She delivers personal and professional guidance for people just starting their careers and for people who are well on their way.

five | “Nice Girls Just Don’t Get It: 99 Ways to Win the Respect You Deserve, the Success You’ve Earned, and the Life You Want” by Lois P. Frankel and Carol Frohlinger

I’ve been a fan of Lois P. Frankel since I first read Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office: Unconscious Mistakes Women Make That Sabotage Their Careers 5+ years ago. Providing the same brand of practical, no-nonsense, expert advice that made her an international bestseller, Nice Girls Just Don’t Get It teaches females the skills we need to continue our transformation from nice girl into winning woman– not just in our careers, but in our relationships, families, and everyday lives, as well.

career books for women, Nice Girls Just Don't Get It, Lois P. Frankel, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

six | “Bossypants” by Tina Fey

Everyone knows Tina Fey is awesome, but most people aren’t aware of the long-winded, uphill battle she fought to secure a spot in comedy television as a female. Bossypants is hilariously funny, which is rare in empowering career books for women, and its content confirms that instead of complaining about the injustices of the world, we should just learn to laugh off the nonsense… and make bank while doing it.

career books for women, Bossypants, Tina Fey, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

seven | “The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women: Why Capable People Suffer from the Imposter Syndrome and How to Thrive in Spite of It” by Valerie Young

In The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women, Valerie Young combines insightful analysis with practical ad­vice and anecdotes to explain what the “impostor syndrome” is, why fraud fears are more common in women, and how you can recognize the way it negatively affects your life. With her empowering, step-by-step plan, you will learn to take ownership of your success, overcome self-doubt, and banish the thought patterns that undermine your ability to act and feel as capable as others already know you are.

career books for women, The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

eight | “Becoming the Boss: New Rules for the Next Generation of Leaders” by Lindsey Pollak

Written exclusively for Millennial readers to address their unique needs, Becoming the Boss is a brisk, tech savvy success manual filled with real-world, actionable tips from expert author Lindsey Pollak. Pollak defines what leadership is and draws on original research, her own extensive experience, and interviews with newly-minted Gen Y managers and entrepreneurs around the world to share the secrets of what makes them successful leaders—and to show young professionals how to use that knowledge to succeed in their own careers.

career books for women, Becoming the Boss, Lindsey Pollak, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

nine | “Yes Please” by Amy Poehler

I couldn’t mention Tina Fey without including her BFF, Amy Poehler, on the same list– for pretty much the same reason. Yes Please is hilarious, and with chapters like “Treat Your Career Like a Bad Boyfriend,” “Plain Girl Versus the Demon” and “The Robots Will Kill Us All,” it’s full of words to live by– and sentiments that will make you think as much as they will make you laugh.

career books for women, Yes Please, Amy Poehler, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

ten | “Woman Up!: Overcome the 7 Deadly Sins that Sabotage Your Success” by Aimee Cohen

I liked this book before even cracking it open. Instead of succumbing to the popularized “Man Up!” movement, Aimee Cohen implores women to put on their big-girl panties, take control of their careers, and Woman UP! Her insights are a product of more than 20 years of experience and a nearly 100% success rate helping hundreds of clients achieve their goals. Using real-life examples, shared experiences, and Aimee’s own guilty confessions, Woman UP! delivers the sage advice every woman wishes she had at the start of her career.

career books for women, Woman Up!, Aimee Cohen, Women Up, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

eleven | “Designed for Success: The 10 Commandments for Women in the Workplace” by Dondi Scumaci

Tapping into more than a decade of experience talking to, listening to, and helping women navigate their careers, Designed for Success teaches you how to gain the confidence you need to fully engage at work, communicate actively, negotiate confidently, think strategically, and never settle for less than you were designed for. It’s a brilliant reference book for all professional females, and it needs to sit on your shelf and be available for you to flip open for any situation.

 

career books for women, Designed for Success, Designed for Success: The 10 Commandments for Women in the Workplace, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

 

twelve | “Girl Code: Unlocking the Secrets to Success, Sanity, and Happiness for the Female Entrepreneur” by Cara Alwill Leyba

I always like to save the best– or one of the best– career books for women for last. GIRL CODE is a roadmap for female entrepreneurs, professional women, “side hustlers,” and anyone in between who wants to become a better woman. This book will not teach you how to build a multimillion dollar business, nor will it teach you about systems or operational processes. However, it will teach you how to build confidence in yourself, reconnect with your why, eradicate jealousy, and ultimately learn the power of connection, which at the end of the day, is what life and business are all about.

 

career books for women, Girl Code, Girl Code: Unlocking the Secrets to Success, Sanity, and Happiness for the Female Entrepreneur, Books to Read in 2016, Books for Females, Books for Girlbosses, Stephanie Ziajka, Diary of a Debutante

 

Are there any other worthy additions I’ve left off my 2015, 2016, or 2017 lists of career books for women? Please feel free to let me know; I’m happy to supplement. Happy reading!

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, I’ll receive compensation. Thank you so much for supporting Diary of a Debutante and my mission of creating honest quality content!

Share:

10 thoughts on “Entrepreneurial Game Strong(er): 12 Career Books for Women in 2016

  1. Rachel Beltz

    Okay even the titles themselves are motivating.. I need to make time to read.. these all sound so good- and appropriate for right now. I’ve been lacking confidence.. big time.

    Reply
  2. Brooke Kelly

    Why would you say you’re not a feminist? A feminist is someone who thinks men and women should be treated equally and women should have control over their bodies. In saying you’re not a feminist, you’re belittling the message that women are equal to men in all areas, and should be treated as such, in my opinion.

    Reply
    1. stephanie.ziajka@yahoo.com Post author

      That answer is simple– because I’m not a modern day feminist. In my opinion, your definition of feminism is literal and incredibly outdated. Feminism has shifted into a movement that dramatically strives to further separate genders by hyper-sensitizing people into believing that there’s something wrong with being a stay-at-home mom or embracing traditional values. I’m a highly educated working female, and I expect and deserve to be treated equally in both my personal and professional lives, as does everyone. However, female empowerment doesn’t come from separating ourselves from the other gender; it comes from working hard, respecting ourselves, and respecting other women and men. That includes respecting the values of all females, including those who are pro-life, conservative, traditional, or anyone who doesn’t want to align with the rhetoric of the feminist movement.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *